What is the Sweetest Thing About Dublin for You? January Exhibition

I am proud to share the news, that I will exhibit some artwork alongside these talented Brazilian creatives this January at Sweet Dublin’s Life.

Curated by Chiara Rucks the event takes place in Bragadeiro’s above The Art Cafe on Frenchman’s Lane Dublin 1 to celebrate Dublin. It promises a wonderful evening filled with art and a Brazilian taste to cheer up a dreary January Monday night.

If you follow along on instagram stories I might even let you in on where my personal favourite spot in Dublin is. What is the sweetest thing about Dublin life for you?

 

#2020 exhibition/ #BraziliansinDublin @Bragadeiros #Chiararucks #DaVinciBox

 

 

Olives, Oysters and Oranges at the Olivier Cornet Gallery

I am lucky enough to have the opportunity this month to exhibit my sketchbook alongside the Dublin Sketchers at the Olivier Cornet Gallery. The current exhibition celebrates Bloomsday and features work from the esteemed artists Eoin Mac Lochlainn, Yanny Petters, Michelle Boyle, Áine Divine, John Keating and Caitríona Ní Threasaigh.

To compliment the exhibition some of the Dublin Sketchers and I have completed sketchbooks along the same theme: “Olives, Oysters and Oranges” aka food references from James Joyces Ulysses.

Gallery proprietor Olivier Cornet who curated the sketchbooks explained he was thinking about how I often love to draw marble sculpture and decided to display the sketchbook up on a plinth. I appreciate the grandeur and elegance of a plinth. My sketchbook sits happily perched on her plinth until June 30th at No. 3 Great Denmark Street. Pop in to enjoy and view the full collection of Joycean sketchbooks and fine art.

 

Reflecting on Reflections in Painting

 

I’m working on this drawing at the moment. It has my reflection in a silver Disney mug, taking a photo of the refection in the mug. So my camera has a wifi setting, I sent the photo to the iPad mini and I use that as a reference while I’m drawing. You possibly can’t make out the reflection of me with the camera yet but you will before it is finished.

Now we all know there is a huge leap between drawing from a picture on your iPad or phone and drawing or painting from real life, in terms of skill. [scroll down-post continues below the image]

When I saw this painting today “Self Portrait, New Studio Kettle” by RHA artist Una Sealy I could really appreciate the challenges she faced executing this work. Here you see her standing at her easel painting the kettle with her portrait reflected in the concave silver body.

It is obvious it is done from life rather than the lesser challenge of working from a 2D image. The artist Una Sealy had to not only transform a 3d form onto a 2d canvas, convey her own reflection distorted by the rounded shape of the kettle and also convince the viewer that this is a silver object without using metallic paint.

You can see this work yourself at the RHA 189th exhibition now open at the Royal Hibernian Gallery until the 10th of August 2019.

From my visit today I think I have chosen my person top 10 favourite artworks. I’m going to pop in again tomorrow to take another look – there are after all 500 pieces to see and then I will post my personal top 10.

 

 BP Portrait Award Winner 2018

Art Academy wishes to extend a warm congratulations to artist Miriam Escofet winner of the BP Portrait Award 2018. Miriam’s winning painting is titled “An Angel at my Table” and is a portrait of her mother.

You can see the portrait, and all selected paintings, in the BP Portrait Award 2018 exhibition, open from Thursday. A day trip to London is on the cards. Try Skyscanner for flights from €55. This is a painting worth seeing in person.

Queens of Art

I am very excited for my upcoming exhibition Queens of Art exhibition at the Minerva Gallery during the Harold’s Cross Community Festival:

Local artist Sheila Flaherty will present an exhibition of her drawings (including one large wall drawing) at the Minerva Gallery* during the week of the festival.

Poet Catherine Ann Cullen will open the exhibition on Thursday, May 17, at 6pm.

Artist’s statement:  Queens of Art is a celebration of successful female artists throughout history. Consisting of 9 portraits, this series of art, focuses the spotlight on these artists and their stories. They serve to remind us of our own individual life goals and inspire us to strive towards them and find success as they have.

*Minerva Gallery is situated in Harold’s Cross beside Five Points coffee shop and across from the Maxol Petrol Station. Map at end of post
Title : Queens of Art
Artist: Sheila Flaherty http://artacademy.ie/
Curator: Eoin Mac Lochlainn https://emacl.wordpress.com/
Opening reception on Thursday the 17th of May at 6pm
Exhibition continues on Saturday 19th May 2-5pm
and Sunday 20th of May 12-5pm

 

  SOLD

 

 

   

Flesh tones; inspiration by the Great Masters at the newly refurbished National Gallery of Ireland

Detail from Head of a Bearded Man by Peter Paul Rubens

I am working on a painting at the moment. Experimenting with oils. By painting I mean realist, representational painting from life. It is a return to a childhood ideal.

As a teenager and even a child, my vision of what I thought attending art college would be like, was unbeknownst to me, already extinct. I had visited the National Gallery of Ireland as a child. Standing in awe before Caravaggio’s The Taking of Christ, I could feel that art was powerful. I needed to be involved in this alchemy. I wanted to learn to create it. I imagined, after school, I would attend something like, what was once The Metropolitan School of Art. There would be easels and drawing classes. There would be artists.

Art college was different from what I expected. I studied Graphic Design and Art and Education in the end. Learned plenty but something was missing. I practiced life drawing in my evenings and free time. Recently at a loose end, I tried oils. I didn’t know how to use them but from the moment I picked up a piece of oil paint and placed it on the canvas, I knew, there is magic here. No other medium will ever compare. It holds a richer and bolder quality than anything I have tried. And as much as I enjoy the graphic side of my work there is a realness to oil that no computer screen or camera can quite live up to.

I understand and believe we reside in an era of a New Renaissance. It is evident in every arena. Where once stood Galileo Galilei , we now explore space. Where Leonardo Da Vinci excelled in engineering, we are speeding ahead with technology. Science, music, theatre, film, literature and art are evolving. To progress the field of visual art we can look to the Old Masters as those in the Renaissance looked to Ancient Greece and Rome. It is my opinion that we must build on this past mastery and raise the standard of art here in Ireland. The National Gallery of Ireland is one place to start.

In order to better understand how Masters like Rembrandt and Rubens approached painting flesh tones, I returned to the place that inspired me as a child, the now recently refurbished National Gallery of Ireland. The NGI is stunning. Below are some studies from todays visit, concerning skin tones. It is wonderful the variation and wide spectrum of colour used to paint skin especially the unexpected colours like violets, greens and greys.

Detail from Lady Gregory by William Orpen

Detail from John Count McCormack by William Orphen

Detail from The Dead Ptarmigan by William Orphen

   Detail from Portrait of Henry Shefflin by Gerry Davis

Detail from Portrait of Philippe Roettiers by Nicolas de Largilliere

Full portrait 

Detail from Lady holding a glove by Rembrandt van Rijn

 

Image of the full portrait

I was especially drawn to the depiction of hair in this detail from Thomas pooley’s Sir Phillip Perceval

As above

Detail from Jupiter and Ganymede by Nicolaes van Helt Stockade

Detail from Saint John  the Baptist in the Wildereness attributed to Michele Desubleo

Detail from The Penitent Magdalene by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

Bretonne by Roderick O’Conor

The Grand Gallery at the NGI

These images are a point of reference for my portrait studies but are best enjoyed in real life. A visit to the National Gallery is a must.