Preview of Art Source at the RDS this weekend

Art Source opened at the RSD last night  (Thur 8th Nov 2018). Here are a preview of my fav pieces from the show. Enjoy. You can view them all in person at the event today, tomorrow and Sunday.

 

 

By Fergus A Ryan

Fergus Ryan‘s Bio

These charming gents were playing at Art Source: Band the Pheonix

Art Source info

Realist painting by Jean Paul Marsman 

By FLETCHER SIBTHORP

By Ken Hamilton

By Stephen Johnston

 

By Stephen Johnston. Follow here

By Gordon Harris

By Gordon Harris

 

photo refs and own photos from the opening: https://www.gormleys.ie/artists/

 

Can You Name all 16 Artworks Featured in The Carters Glorious Apeshit Music Video?

Beyonce and Jay Z aka The Carters, take over the french art museum The Louvre for the visuals for their music video Apeshit.

Put your art history knowledge to the test. See how many pieces of art from the video you can name. The answers are under each still, so if you don’t want an early spoiler, take care to scroll slowly. Here we go:

1.

Too easy. We all know this one, by one of my personal favourite artists of all time. Sorry zero points for guessing correctly here. Next.

2.Sculpture of Nike – not the sports shoes; the Greek Goddess of Victory. See if you can spot a miniature statue of Nike on the table in the painting An Angel at my Table by Miriam Escofet. She won this years BP Portrait Prize for her painting. Nike indeed heralded victory here.

3.

The dancers preform in front of The Coronation of Napoleon by Jacques-Louis David. The painting depicts Napoleon crowning his wife Josephine, the first Empress of the french. Is anyone else being crowned in this video? What do you think? Scroll down for number 4.

4.Great Sphinx of Tanis which happens to be todays Artwork of the Day on the The Louvre’s website  for fellow art nerds.

5.

Venus de Milo, one of the most famous works of ancient Greek Sculpture. Sometimes it’s called the Aphrodite of Milos so both answers are correct.

6.Jay Z raps in front of Géricault’s “Raft of The Medusa”

7.

Marie Benoist’s Portrait d’une négresse

8.

A second painting byJacques-Louis David is featured. The Oath of the Horatii, is skewed by the camera angle so double points for naming this one.

9.

French artist Jacques-Louis David features again with, The Intervention of the Sabine Women

10.

Ary Scheffer, The Ghosts of Paolo and Francesca Appear to Dante and Virgil

11.

12.
13.

If you answered number 6 correctly, you probably also named this second Géricault painting The Charging Chasseur too.

14.

16. Bonus Points for naming this one: because to be perfectly honest , I can’t think of the answer myself.

How did you do? Interesting choices of artwork, aren’t they. What do you think each was chosen to represent? Also what have we missed, comment below,  I’d love to know your thoughts. Enjoy watching the full video here. Buy the album here. 

Photo Credits: Stills from the music video on Youtube.

 BP Portrait Award Winner 2018

Art Academy wishes to extend a warm congratulations to artist Miriam Escofet winner of the BP Portrait Award 2018. Miriam’s winning painting is titled “An Angel at my Table” and is a portrait of her mother.

You can see the portrait, and all selected paintings, in the BP Portrait Award 2018 exhibition, open from Thursday. A day trip to London is on the cards. Try Skyscanner for flights from €55. This is a painting worth seeing in person.

Queens of Art

I am very excited for my upcoming exhibition Queens of Art exhibition at the Minerva Gallery during the Harold’s Cross Community Festival:

Local artist Sheila Flaherty will present an exhibition of her drawings (including one large wall drawing) at the Minerva Gallery* during the week of the festival.

Poet Catherine Ann Cullen will open the exhibition on Thursday, May 17, at 6pm.

Artist’s statement:  Queens of Art is a celebration of successful female artists throughout history. Consisting of 9 portraits, this series of art, focuses the spotlight on these artists and their stories. They serve to remind us of our own individual life goals and inspire us to strive towards them and find success as they have.

*Minerva Gallery is situated in Harold’s Cross beside Five Points coffee shop and across from the Maxol Petrol Station. Map at end of post
Title : Queens of Art
Artist: Sheila Flaherty http://artacademy.ie/
Curator: Eoin Mac Lochlainn https://emacl.wordpress.com/
Opening reception on Thursday the 17th of May at 6pm
Exhibition continues on Saturday 19th May 2-5pm
and Sunday 20th of May 12-5pm

 

  SOLD

 

 

   

Camille Claudel; Wonder Women Exhibition.

Drawing this lady’s portrait atm for the upcoming #WonderWomen exhibition as part of the Harold’s Cross Community Festival #HaroldsCross

Women were not permitted to wear trousers. Camille found the heavy skirted attire women were sanctioned to wear cumbersome for studio work, especially when climbing up and down ladders with heavy buckets of clay. However Camille was successful in obtaining, if you can imagine, a licence to wear pants. #CamilleClaudel #ArtAcademy

 

The Artists’ Cookbook launches this Friday and you are invited.

This painting “Sweet Ramiro Pepper” 40 x 30 cm by yours truly will feature in the upcoming The Artists’ Cookbook. This coffee table must-have, features a compilation of specially commissioned food related art works and a favourite recipe by each artist. I promise none of the recipes involve oil paint or turps.

The book will launch this Friday the 18th of August 7-9.30 pm. And you are invited. The event is taking place at Airbnb’s Headquarters at Grand Canal Dock in Dublin City. Sign in is at 7pm. The book will raise funds for the charity Syrias Vibes.

“It’s free in and each attendee gets a free copy of the cookbook (worth €25). There will also be complimentary canapes from the Airbnb chefs, free wine and beers courtesy of Rascals Brewing Company.

We will also have a bumper raffle with original artworks from the cookbook (Pato Cassinoni, Cathy Callan, Rikki Van Den Berg), some art prints from Danleo, Senir X and Gintare Venckute), a $250 Airbnb voucher, vouchers for top Dublin restaurants (Coppinger Row, Dublin Pizza Co, Charlotte Quay, Dockyard No. 8, The Fumbally, Chez Max, Diep etc) as well as sweet Syrias Vibes merch.

Raising funds for the doctors and ambulances at Raqqa, Syria and for the Psychology Programme in the Bajed Kandala camp on the Iraqi borde.” – Andy Sweeney, Project Director

There is even an after party in Charlottes Quay afterward. Facebook event link here. See you there

 

My page from the book. Pick up a copy to check out all of the art and recipes.

Flesh tones; inspiration by the Great Masters at the newly refurbished National Gallery of Ireland

Detail from Head of a Bearded Man by Peter Paul Rubens

I am working on a painting at the moment. Experimenting with oils. By painting I mean realist, representational painting from life. It is a return to a childhood ideal.

As a teenager and even a child, my vision of what I thought attending art college would be like, was unbeknownst to me, already extinct. I had visited the National Gallery of Ireland as a child. Standing in awe before Caravaggio’s The Taking of Christ, I could feel that art was powerful. I needed to be involved in this alchemy. I wanted to learn to create it. I imagined, after school, I would attend something like, what was once The Metropolitan School of Art. There would be easels and drawing classes. There would be artists.

Art college was different from what I expected. I studied Graphic Design and Art and Education in the end. Learned plenty but something was missing. I practiced life drawing in my evenings and free time. Recently at a loose end, I tried oils. I didn’t know how to use them but from the moment I picked up a piece of oil paint and placed it on the canvas, I knew, there is magic here. No other medium will ever compare. It holds a richer and bolder quality than anything I have tried. And as much as I enjoy the graphic side of my work there is a realness to oil that no computer screen or camera can quite live up to.

I understand and believe we reside in an era of a New Renaissance. It is evident in every arena. Where once stood Galileo Galilei , we now explore space. Where Leonardo Da Vinci excelled in engineering, we are speeding ahead with technology. Science, music, theatre, film, literature and art are evolving. To progress the field of visual art we can look to the Old Masters as those in the Renaissance looked to Ancient Greece and Rome. It is my opinion that we must build on this past mastery and raise the standard of art here in Ireland. The National Gallery of Ireland is one place to start.

In order to better understand how Masters like Rembrandt and Rubens approached painting flesh tones, I returned to the place that inspired me as a child, the now recently refurbished National Gallery of Ireland. The NGI is stunning. Below are some studies from todays visit, concerning skin tones. It is wonderful the variation and wide spectrum of colour used to paint skin especially the unexpected colours like violets, greens and greys.

Detail from Lady Gregory by William Orpen

Detail from John Count McCormack by William Orphen

Detail from The Dead Ptarmigan by William Orphen

   Detail from Portrait of Henry Shefflin by Gerry Davis

Detail from Portrait of Philippe Roettiers by Nicolas de Largilliere

Full portrait 

Detail from Lady holding a glove by Rembrandt van Rijn

 

Image of the full portrait

I was especially drawn to the depiction of hair in this detail from Thomas pooley’s Sir Phillip Perceval

As above

Detail from Jupiter and Ganymede by Nicolaes van Helt Stockade

Detail from Saint John  the Baptist in the Wildereness attributed to Michele Desubleo

Detail from The Penitent Magdalene by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

Bretonne by Roderick O’Conor

The Grand Gallery at the NGI

These images are a point of reference for my portrait studies but are best enjoyed in real life. A visit to the National Gallery is a must.

The story behind the winking playing card on the canal

Photo credit Instagram: @bmv_20th_century_boy

Each Summer Dublin Canvas pours it’s kaleidoscope of colour across Dublin city.  Traffic light boxes are adorned with a rainbow of public artworks and our city becomes a wonderful outdoor art gallery curated by David Murtagh. An exciting group of exceptional artists are painting again this Summer and I am honoured to be counted among them.

Tomorrow morning you might spot Queen Ester winking at you, from her corner at Canal Road / Grove Road, near Rathmines bridge.  Ester was originally designed from my degree show, storytelling by choosing two elements from my childhood, namely Mass and memories of Daddy playing card games.

Ester is a biblical story from the Old Testament. At the time a graphic designer I chose to tell the story using the medium of re-appropriated playing cards. She is a queen with a kind heart, a dangerous secret and a precarious plan.

Photo credit Instagram: @cristinlarkin

 

In the story, Ester is a poor girl but chosen by the king of Persia for her beauty. The King passes a law to “exterminate” all of the Jews in his lands. Brave and kind Ester hatches a dangerous plan to save her people. She herself is secretly a Jew. Hoping the king will avoid the bad PR of having to kill his queen, she reveals that she is Jewish, forcing the hand of the king to revoke the cruel law. Her plan is as precarious as a house of cards.

       

She plays a dangerous game, gambling with her own life. On the canal Ester winks and shares her secret plot with passers-by. Secret codes and symbols are hidden in her image.

  

The painting process employed, is that similar to screen printing or reduction block or lino print. This design uses only 4 colours yellow, red, blue and black.* Each colour is applied separately and in order from light to dark. It was fun to work on, especially on a glorious day like today.

Yellow is primarily applied

Next some red

The blue is put down

And finally voilá, the darkest colour, black

I actually did the back and sides before the face:

You can look forward to more Dublin Canvas art popping up all over the city in the coming weeks. Keep an eye on the website and follow on Instagram for more pics of all the work.

Photo credit Twitter handle:

A little behind the scenes stencil cutout

*yes, I know, I cheated. I decided to pop on a bit of green paint marker on the stem of the flower at the 11th hour but hey.

 

 

 

 

Hatch and Sons has Just Opened a Second Eatery in the Dreamiest Location

Hatch and Harry make a dreamy brunch combination. The well-loved informal dining favourite Hatch and Sons opened a second venue last Friday at the Hugh Lane Gallery on Parnell Street, where once housed Itsa Bagel. I popped in today with a pal to enjoy a bite and some artistic inspiration.

Hatch and Sons are located in the bright and airy room downstairs and even have an outdoor seating area to enjoy on a sunny day. Just take a right as you come in the front door and go down the stair between the reception desk and the bookshop.

In contrast to the natural light of the café, the magical Harry Clarke room (to the left after the reception on entrance) is set in a darkened room. From this shaded space, bursting with jewelled coloured light, Harry Clarke’s Eve of Saint Agnes transports you into his dreamlike fairytale land.

Stained glass windows are often associated with church windows and religious iconography. However this particular stained glass window, is set out like a graphic novel, telling a love story based on the poem “The Eve of Saint. Agnes” by English Romantic poet John Keats.

The poem this window is based on is very long. In short it tells the love story of Madeline and Porphyro. January 20th was known as the Eve of St. Agnes. On this eve young girls would fast and go to bed early. The feast day of St Agnes was the next day January 21st. If you followed a bunch of rules, fasting, bed early etc you could hope to dream of your future husband on that night. This was before iPads, Facebook, Tinder and online dating sites, so extreme lengths were gone to.

Madeline, daughter of a Lord, lived in a great castle. She was hoping to dream of her husband this night. She had followed all of the rules and conditions. She was in love with a man called Porphyro however. But her father the great Lord Maurice had forbidden her to marry him. Just like in Romeo and Juliette the girls childhood nurse gives a helping hand and helps Porphyro enter the castle in secret.

Madeline is woken by Porphyro’s music and finds he is in her room. She isn’t sure at first if she is dreaming of her future husband as it is the Eve of St. Agnes or if he is really there. Porphyro assures Madeline this is not a dream.

Like the Ed Sheeran song “Nancy Mulligan” Madeline and Porphyro run away to be together despite the family differences.

This window is so detailed and gorgeous. It contains lines from the poem on each of the 14 panels. Purple, blue and red and strongly referenced in the poem and so Harry Clarke uses these colours quite a bit in the window. Pop in and see it for yourself, because like all beautiful things, it is best viewed in person.

Admission to the gallery is free and does not require booking. The Hugh Lane opens Tuesday to Thursday 9.45am– 6pm, Friday 9.45am – 5pm, Saturday 10am – 5pm, Sunday 11am – 5pm and is closed on Mondays.

Detail from the window.

The super food salad was a very tasty and healthy dish. I’ll recommend it. Definitely a winner for me.

Lots of natural light at Hatch and Sons

The gorgeous turquoise and gold entrance door of the Hugh Lane. This photo isn’t doing the colours justice. This is my dream front door.