A wonderful week at Art Academy July Summer Camp 2017

The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark Michelangelo

I had the pleasure of teaching art to some remarkable young people last week ( 17 – 21 July 2017 ), from as young as the age of 5 up to 13 years of age. They all had one thing in common; a love of art and a dedication to challenging themselves to greater heights.

Art Academy training teaches traditional art skills. It avoids the gluing dried pasta onto card or make prints of your hands and calling the prints spiders, genre of art education.  You wouldn’t find any glitter glue or poster paints at the Academy. Art Academy seeks to raise the standard of art and art training here in Ireland. Classical art skills are the fundamental building blocks of any artistic journey.

Last weeks young artists preformed very well. They are a credit to themselves and their families. The future of art in Ireland is safely in their hands. Just because you are small it does not mean that you are not capable of great things.

Michelangelo, arguably the greatest artist and sculptor that ever lived, was 4 years old when he carved his first piece of stone. Bit of a health and safety issue with giving 4 year olds chisels and hammers ( my insurance company if you are reading this, calm down, I sent zero children into a quarry )  but you can take my point.

There is no instant gratification with realist art. We are all used to instant results so this can be a challenge. I can order the art materials for the entire week of the camp with one click of the mouse and they will promptly arrive at my door. With art, it takes more time and focus to accomplish your goals than many other things. It is a mindful practice. When, eventually, you complete a challenge, there is a high sense of achievement as you are confident in yourself, that you have earned your result.

I will attach some pictures and give a quick overview of our lovely art week. And sincerely congratulate the artists again on a job well done. There will be further art camps announced. I like to keep the Academy camps small in numbers so watch this space if you are interested booking.

First we had a look at some colour theory. How do we mix colours? What makes a colour dark or light? What makes it primary or secondary? What is brown?

We took a look at some of Harry Clarke’s work and his wonderful use of colour. The artists made some Harry Clarke inspired stained glass of their own.

The Harry Clarke style pieces left drying.

The artists worked on their monochrome tonal scales

The artist were introduced to the artist Caravaggio and his use of light and shade.

Our theory and demo area

Caravaggio used light and shade (tone) to render form and make his 2D paintings look 3 dimensional.

A painting of the sphere  above therefore differs from a painting of a flat circle below.

Students created tonal studies of the effect light has on form.

Combining colour theory with tonal studies the art students worked on identifying the main light and shade areas of a still life, using the restricted palette.

The fallout every evening 😉

Finally the students completed the fundamental art elements revision exercise.

Rathmines Library outfitted Art Academy with a mini art library for the week. We are very grateful for these great references. There was an art library and “free drawing area” available for when artists need to take mini breaks.

I am sorry I didn’t take more pictures of the work. Well done to all the artists to took part. A fantastic week.

Some client feedback 🙂 x

The art studio/gallery space for the week

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art Camp for grown-ups at Block T

As an artists and/or art teacher I believe that it absolutely imperative that we are  the perpetual learner. Here in Ireland there are little hidden pockets of artistic gold waiting to be absorbed. I  intend to seek these out, enjoy them for myself to build on my artistic knowledge but also share them with you.

One such gem can be found in Block T. Recently I have had the pleasure of completed the realism oil painting course there, under the expert tutelage of Florentine academy multi-award winning artist  Nicholas Benedict Robinson. I will share with you my journey on his course in the images below. It being by no means the poster model but it gives you some idea of how I progressed the painting. We worked from direct observation of the live model for 6 Wednesday evenings. Nicholas is an excellent teacher of this method.

The good news is there is another such upcoming workshop so don’t feel you have missed out. There is a full week coming up 31st July – 4th of August. Keep an eye on the Block T website and Nicholas’s website for further courses. You can check how I got on at the last workshop below: